Home » Archive by category "Learning & Education" (Page 2)

How to Improve a Classroom Learning Environment for Students With Dyslexia

This article is part 7 of 10 in the column Simple Words

Students with dyslexia may have difficult academic experiences due to the nature of their abilities to perform in a traditional classroom environment, such as problems with accurate or fluent word recognition, poor spelling, and reduced decoding proficiency.

Although the signs of dyslexia vary, providing general support and making accommodations in a classroom setting will benefit a majority of children with learning differences and improve their academic experience significantly. Read more

Child Care Businesses Nearing Crisis Mode as Funding Lags

Who will be the thought leaders of tomorrow? Soon enough, today’s business people, lawmakers, educators, and military leaders will hand the reins of this country to a new generation. Some of us worry that we’re not preparing our youngest children for leadership despite evidence that the academic skills and character traits needed for lifetime success are instilled in early childhood.

In short, the better our child care, the better prepared children are for school and life. Child care businesses provide a vital service that Philadelphia cannot do without, and yet we are in crisis, with the entire community feeling the repercussions. Read more

How Retained Primitives Could Affect Learning Disabilities

This article is part 6 of 10 in the column Simple Words

We are all born with primitive reflexes. Their presence is critical to the survival of the infant. They serve as the training wheels for the brain early on in the infancy and show that the infant’s nervous system is functioning normally. On the other hand, if primitive reflexes persist to exist long after the expected integration age, they may hinder the healthy development of the child.

Primitive reflexes are automatic muscle reactions in response to outside stimulation that are typical in a newborn and naturally integrate during the baby’s first year. Read more

On Coaching Millennials: A Guest Interview with Jess Hopkins

This article is part 5 of 10 in the column Simple Words

I had the pleasure of meeting Jess Hopkins when she gave a seminar at a Positive Parenting Event. Her talk led to a lot of constructive discussions in our home about how to support both of our children, dyslexic or not, in the cut-throat academic life ahead of them. In addition to causing us to discuss topics already on our “Learn More About” list, her comprehensive presentation gave us easy-to-apply tools to begin implementing self-compassion in our daily lives.

Jess is a twice-certified life coach, holding dual masters degrees in counseling psychology and applied positive psychology from the University of Pennsylvania. As a coach, she helps teens Read more

Quaker Education: In Pursuit of a More Equitable Future

Providing children with a high-quality and equitable education is often treated as a problem for parents, teachers, and administrators rather than a joy. Quaker schools, in sharp contrast, energetically approach the puzzle of how to educate children with diverse gifts and from a range of socioeconomic backgrounds.

Quakers, who believed people should be free to worship on their own terms, came to America in 1682 to escape religious persecution in Europe. In 1689, the Religious Society of Friends founded the first Quaker school, Philadelphia’s William Penn Charter School, which continues to operate today. Read more

SCOTUS Decision Gives Leverage to Families of Students With Special Needs

This article is part 11 of 15 in the column Kid's Capital Watch

Families of students with special needs won an important legal battle when the Supreme Court sided with the parents of an autistic boy who argued that their school district had failed to provide their son a “free and appropriate education.”

The family sued the Douglas County School District for private school tuition after their son, known as “Drew,” made better progress in a private school than he had in a district public school. His parents said Drew hadn’t been learning adequately because the public school’s individualized education program (IEP) was not ambitious enough. Read more

Parent to Parent

This article is part 4 of 10 in the column Simple Words

Pamela Guest is the founder and chief editor of IEP Magazine. “IEP” stands for “Individualized Education Program/Plan.” The IEP is the document developed for each public school child who needs special education. Pamela’s mission is to bring attention to inequities, advocate for change where it is needed, and help parents with the information and knowledge they need to effectively advocate for their children in the public school system.

More importantly, Pamela is the parent of a dyslexic child and struggled throughout her son’s education. She had to learn the ins and outs of the system on her own with little to no support. As my path crossed hers on our journey to help others facing the steep dyslexia hike, our common goals brought us together. Education is her passion and this is my interview with her. Read more

The Plight of Children at Risk in the Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Communities and the Failure of Government and Pandering Politicians to Protect Them

This article is part 7 of 13 in the column Marci A. Hamilton

Children in the United States are routinely sacrificed on the pyre of their parents’ faith by pandering politicians without a moral compass. Children don’t vote but insular religious communities often vote as a bloc mandated by the male officials at the top, and that fact is not lost on power-hungry politicians like those in Utah who let the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (FLDS) patriarchs marry off girls and abandon boys so that the men will have a better place in heaven. The same relationship between elected officials and the ultra-Orthodox Jewish communities exists: there are known risks to children but these politicians look the other way as they are feted by the rabbis and a community that keeps children at risk. Read more

Mom, You’re Not So Good at Danish Yet

This article is part 2 of 4 in the column American Mom In Denmark

Our family is about to celebrate the two-year anniversary of our arrival in Denmark, known to the expat community here as a “Danniversary.” So here we are, two years into this Danish adventure, and I’m sorry to say that the following is the most successful unscripted conversation in Danish that I’ve had with a stranger yet (translation mine).

Cashier: Oh, I see your cats very well like to eat.
Me: Yes. Yes. That they do. Read more

Eight Guidelines for Parents of Dyslexic Children

This article is part 3 of 10 in the column Simple Words

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Dyslexia is frequently called a hidden disability. Although many, including me, would challenge using the word “disability,” the word “hidden” rings true.

Dyslexia can be invisible to someone who does not know what symptoms to look for. So as parents, we often trust medical or educational personnel to catch dyslexia symptoms and educate us on what needs to be done to help our children. This can be a big mistake.

As a parent of a dyslexic child, I have learned what works and what doesn’t work, and have condensed my experiences into these eight guidelines. Read more

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