Home » Archive by category "Sports & Play"

Why Kids Need Risk, Fear, and Excitement in Play

“Be careful!” “Not so high!” “Stop that!” Concerned parents can often be heard urging safety when children are at play.

Recent research suggests that this may be overprotective and that kids need more opportunities for risky play outdoors.

Risky play is thrilling and exciting play where children test their boundaries and flirt with uncertainty. They climb trees, build forts, roam the neighborhood with friends, or play capture the flag. Research shows such play is associated with increased physical activity, social skills, risk management skills, resilience, and self-confidence. Read more

Why Make-Believe Play Is an Important Part of Child Development

Visit any preschool classroom during free play and you will likely see a child pretending to be someone else.

Make-believe play is a ubiquitous part of early childhood. And beyond being fun for kids, pretending and other kinds of imaginative play are also believed by some to be critical to healthy child development.

Research has found a relationship between pretend play and a child’s developing creativity, understanding of others, and social competence with peers.

As a psychologist who studies imaginary play and Read more

Kindergartners Get Little Time to Play: Why Does It Matter?

Being a kindergartner today is very different from being a kindergartner 20 years ago. In fact, it is more like first grade.

Researchers have demonstrated that 5-year-olds are spending more time engaged in teacher-led academic learning activities than play-based learning opportunities that facilitate child-initiated investigations and foster social development among peers. Read more

The Upside of Playful Risk

This article is part 7 of 8 in the column Flights of Fancy

Summer is here, time for kids’ action adventure.

Reread that opening sentence. Did you think of movies released in the summertime?

Or did you think of the adventurous active pastimes that kids engage in during summer? Did you think of: Diving off the high diving board into the deep end of the swimming pool? Climbing toward a tall tree’s top and perching there for a while looking down at the world? Crawling in through the window of a homestead that nobody has lived in for years? Riding a bike with no hands on the handlebars down the steepest hill in the neighborhood? Read more

Child Sex Abuse by the Numbers: Why Sports Must Be the Next Frontier in the Protection of Children

This article is part 10 of 13 in the column Marci A. Hamilton

The headlines on child sex abuse have been dominated for years by issues from the Catholic Church, culminating with last year’s Oscar-winning movie, Spotlight. There have been other scandals, of course, like Penn State, the New England boarding schools, and the polygamist sects, among many, but the Catholic cases and issues have continually rolled into the headlines. The latest is that the Manhattan Archdiocese in New York is partially covering the cost of sex abuse claims there by getting a mortgage of $100 million on hotel property that it owns.

I am the last person to say that the Read more

Leisure Time in a Small Town

This article is part 3 of 4 in the column American Mom In Denmark

Well, in case you had notions to the contrary, I’m here to tell you that a small Danish town isn´t exactly a fountain of exciting things to do, that is, after the bakery has lost its sheen and become merely a routine pleasure. At some point, our family had to face the reality that in Billund, a town of 6,000 people, we had to make our own fun, especially once the LEGOland theme park closed for the season.

As a remedy, a friend and I formed a ukulele group, BUF (Billund Uke Forening, the last word meaning club or association), and we play together about once a week. Though other members will Read more

Play With Me

This article is part 1 of 4 in the column American Mom In Denmark

In January 2015, I moved to a small town in rural Denmark with my husband and two young sons. Only two weeks before, we’d moved from Somerville, Massachusetts, out of the only home our kids had ever known. Our life there had been relatively happy and satisfying: We lived within reasonable walking distance of a subway stop, a lovely Indian takeout place, a decent Mexican restaurant, a lovely bakery, the Tufts University campus, six parks, two groceries, and a beautiful walking path along the Alewife and Mystic Rivers. We had nice groups of friends from various stages of our adult lives scattered around the area, and we had a small, modest apartment with wonderful upstairs neighbors and a vegetable garden in the back yard. The Boston area had been good to us and I wasn’t exactly itching to leave. Read more

Getting Kids to Read Over the Summer Takes a Village

Kids on lawn reading Harry Potter

What adults might not remember about the long, carefree summer days of youth is how much they forgot between June and September. In fact, the typical child experiences a three-month loss in reading achievement known as the “summer slide.”

Philadelphia Foundation LogoOn July 21st, Philadelphia-area children’s advocates, organizers, and nonprofits gathered at the Philadelphia Foundation for a conversation on how to promote childhood literacy by working collaboratively.

The prospect of using summer as an opportunity to hone literacy skills might induce groans from most kids, but solutions to the “summer slide” can actually be entertaining. Read more

Flagged: Children on July 4th

This article is part 2 of 8 in the column Flights of Fancy

Logo: Flights Of Fancy by Cindy Dell Clark, PHD with flying owl

 

 

During the years 2005 to 2012, when I conducted research on July 4th family rituals, the United States imported — mostly from China — over $32,000,000 worth of American flags.  These flags testify to and plot the vigorous ceremonial life of the American nation-state:  decorating military veterans graves’ at Memorial Day and the caskets of war dead from Afghanistan and Iraq, waving atop flag poles in front of schools and inside classrooms, at capitals and public buildings.  In public places, flags are daily raised and later lowered, raised only at half mast to honor the passing of revered Americans. Read more

Time for a Game Changer: Playgrounds Fight to Stay Relevant to Kids and Parents

Stroll through your local playground on a summer day and take note of what’s missing: swings, seesaws, jungle gyms, and, all too often, children.

Whether kept indoors by structured activities, parental fears, or the allure of Xbox and air conditioning, kids today enjoy less free-range play than their parents. And given that the effects of play deprivation extend from ADHD to lack of empathy, carving out the time and space for play could be as important to future generations as protecting our wild spaces and natural resources.

Playgrounds are an important community partner in the fight for children’s right to play, but only if they can hold their own in a sea of other options. The first step? Battling the boring. Read more

CW News Tile

Categories

Columns

Archives

Be Part Of The Movement!

Sign-up to receive our FREE news and updates.
* = required field
Areas of Interest








Focused Issues











powered by MailChimp!