Data Reports and Indicators of Child Well-Being


At Child’s World America, we feel that in order to improve the well-being of children in our society, we must understand both our strengths and weaknesses. It is human nature to collect data and learn as much as we can. Part of where we fail our children is in what we do, or don’t do, with the information we gather. The data reports listed below are full of amazing facts about our society as well as recognition that we still have a lot of work to do.

To help us provide current and relevant data reports, we need your recommendations. If you would like to suggest a data report we don’t have listed, please use ourReport / Indicator Referral Submission.


 

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Supporting and Caring for our Gender Expansive Youth: Lessons from the Human Rights Campaign’s Youth Survey (2014)

Photo Gender Expansive Youth Reportby the Human Rights Campaign Foundation and Gender Spectrum

Over the last decade or so, new conversations around gender have been emerging. From the cover of TIME magazine to prominent television coverage with Diane Sawyer and Oprah Winfrey, the increased visibility of children and youth whose gender identities and expressions challenge conventional understandings is teaching us that gender is not as simple as what the doctor declares at birth.

Even as many parents and youth-serving professionals — including educators, healthcare providers and social workers — try to keep pace with the contemporary lives of youth, a gap is growing between generational conceptions and expressions of gender.


Reports are listed alphabetically by title

 

A Running Start Philadelphia (2015)

by Shared Prosperity PhiladelphiaA Running Start - Philadelphia

The citywide early learning plan, For every child birth to 5.

The five years from infancy to kindergarten are the most important in life. Poverty and the trauma that often accompanies it can slow the development of infants, toddlers, and preschool children. It can affect how physically and emotionally healthy they grow up, how well they get along with others, and how well they learn. High quality early learning is one of the most effective means to help children overcome the effects of inter-generational poverty and develop the tools they need to succeed in school, get good jobs, and raise healthy families themselves.

A Running Start Philadelphia is a comprehensive plan to improve the school readiness of our city’s youngest children. It was developed over the last eight months with involvement from 400 community leaders, parents, educators and early childhood education providers. It is a crucial component of Shared Prosperity Philadelphia, the city’s comprehensive anti-poverty strategy launched formally in the summer of 2013.


America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being (2015)

by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics
Americas Children-KNIoWB 2015

The Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics’ primary mission is to enhance data collection and reporting on children and families. America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2015 provides the Nation with a summary of national indicators of our children’s well-being and monitors changes in these indicators. The purposes of the report are to improve reporting of Federal data on children and families, make these data available in an easy-to-use, nontechnical format, stimulate discussions among policymakers and the public, and spur exchanges between the statistical and policy communities.

There are many interrelated aspects of children’s well-being. This report identifies seven major domains that characterize the well-being of a child and influence the likelihood that a child will grow to be a well-educated, economically secure, productive, and healthy adult. The seven domains are family and social environment, economic circumstances, health care, physical environment and safety, behavior, education, and health. These domains are interrelated and can have synergistic effects on well-being.


Child and Youth Well-Being Index (CWI) Report (2014)

by the Duke Center for Child and Family PolicyCWBI 2014

Each year, the Child and Youth Well-Being Index Project at Duke University publishes a report on a comprehensive measure of how children are faring in the United States.

The resultant National Child and Youth Well-Being Index (CWI) is based on a composite of 28 Key Indicators of Well-Being, grouped into seven Quality-of-Life/Well-Being Domains. These Domains are: Family Economic Well-Being, Safe/Risky Behavior, Social Relationships, Emotional/Spiritual Well-Being, Community Engagement, Educational Attainment, and Health.

This year’s report includes:

  • calculated values of the CWI for each of the years from 1975, the base year of the Index, to 2011;
  • an updated estimate of the CWI for 2012 based on observed values of Key Indicators that have become available since last year’s report;
  • an initial estimate of the CWI for 2013 based on those observed values of the Key Indicators for 2013 that are currently available, along with projections of the other Key Indicators.

Child Health USA 2014 (2015)

by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: HRSAChild Health USA 2014

The Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) is pleased to present Child Health USA 2014. Now in its 24th year, Child Health USA provides a centralized resource for data on the health and well-being of America’s infants, children, and adolescents. MCHB envisions a Nation in which the right to grow to one’s full potential is universally assured through attention to the comprehensive physical, psychological, and social needs of the maternal and child population. To assess the progress toward achieving this vision, MCHB has compiled this resource of secondary data for more than 50 health status and health care indicators. It provides both graphical and textual summaries of relevant data, and addresses long-term trends where applicable and feasible.

All of the data discussed within the text of Child Health USA are from the same sources as the information in the corresponding graphs, unless otherwise noted. In general, only statistically significant differences are commented on; however, not all significant differences are discussed. Data are presented for the following target population groups of the Title V Maternal and Child Health Block Grant: infants, children, adolescents, and children with special health care needs.

Child Health USA 2014 addresses health status and health services utilization within this population, and offers insight into the Nation’s progress toward the goals set out in the MCHB’s strategic plan—to assure quality of care, eliminate barriers and health disparities, promote an environment that supports maternal and child health, and improve the health infrastructure and system of care for women, infants, children, and families.


Children’s Budget 2015 (2015)

by First FocusChildrens Budget 2015

The federal government makes more than 200 distinct investments in children. These include traditional children’s initiatives like education and child abuse and neglect prevention. They also include other investments that improve the lives of kids, like Medicaid and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (formerly Food Stamps).

Children’s Budget 2015 offers a detailed guide to federal spending on children and an invaluable resource for those seeking to improve the lives of America’s youth.


Doing Better for Children (2009)

by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Doing Better for Children 2009

This report offers an overview of child well-being across the OECD. It compares policy-focused measures of child well-being in six dimensions, chosen to cover the major aspects of children’s lives: material well-being; housing and environment; education; health and safety; risk behaviors; and quality of school life. Each dimension is a composite of several indicators, which in turn have been selected in part because they are relatively amenable to policy choices. This chapter presents the theory, methodology and data sources behind the measures, as well as the indicators for each member country in a comparable fashion. It is at the individual level that the indicators can best inform policy and comparisons can be most readily made. The data is reported by country and, where possible, by sex, age and migrant status. All indicators presented in the framework are already publicly available. There has been no attempt to collect new data. Note that no single aggregate score or overall country ranking for child well-being is presented. Nevertheless, it is clear that no OECD country performs well on all fronts.


How Much Can High-Quality Universal Pre-K Reduce Achievement Gaps? (2016)NIEER 2016

by Center for American Progress and National Institute for Early Education Research

Many children of color and children from low-income families enter kindergarten without the academic skills they need to succeed. Compared to their white peers, African American and Hispanic children are anywhere from 9 to 10 months behind in math and 7 to 12 months behind in reading when they enter kindergarten.1 These achievement gaps are concerning: Math and reading abilities at kindergarten entry are powerful predictors of later school success, and children who enter kindergarten already behind are unlikely to catch up.2 Moreover, in the past 50 years, minimal progress has been made toward reducing these achievement gaps.


Kids Count 2015 Data Book (2015)

by The Annie E. Casey FoundationAECF-Kids Count 2015

The KIDS COUNT Data Book is an annual publication that assesses child well-being nationally and across the 50 states, as well as in the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Using an index of 16 indicators, the report ranks states on overall child well-being and in economic well-being, education, health and family and community.

The 2015 KIDS COUNT Data Book focuses on America’s children in the midst of the country’s economic recovery. While data show improvements in child health and education, more families are struggling to make ends meet, and a growing number of kids live in high-poverty neighborhoods. In addition to ranking states in several areas of child well-being, the report also examines the influence of parents’ education, health and other life circumstances on their children.


Migration and Child Welfare: Research Brief (2010)

by the Migration and Child Welfare National Network:Migration and Child Welfare 2010

Alan J. Dettlaff, PhD, and Ilze Earner, PhD

While the rapid growth of children of immigrants in the population may suggest a corresponding increase in their contact with social service systems, the presence of children of immigrants in the child welfare system is unknown, as this information is not collected uniformly at the state or national levels. As a result, little is known about the characteristics, risk factors, or incidence of maltreatment among children of immigrants who come to the attention of this system. Additionally, little is known about how those factors differ from children in families who are native to the United States.

This research brief provides findings from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW ) related to the involvement of children of immigrants in the child welfare system. These findings represent the first national data concerning the characteristics, risk factors, and types of maltreatment experienced by this population. An increased understanding and awareness of these issues can be used to improve the quality of service delivery to immigrant children and families involved with the child welfare system.


The National Survey of Children’s Health 2007 (2009)

by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: HRSANSCH 2007

While data sources exist to measure and monitor the health of children in the United States, few take into account the many contexts in which children grow and develop, including their family and community environments. The National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH), conducted in 2007, addresses multiple aspects of children’s health and well-being— including physical and mental health, health care, and social well-being—as well as aspects of the family and the neighborhood that can affect children’s health, on both the national and State levels. The survey was supported and developed by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau and conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics.
This represents the second round of the NSCH, which was conducted for the first time in 2003. While many of the indicators reported here were reported in the 2003 survey, some of the survey questions have been revised to improve the quality of the data obtained. Those changes, however, may influence parents’ responses. Therefore, we note where current findings cannot be compared with those reported in 2003.


Report Card 11: Child Well-Being in Rich Countries (2013)

by the UNICEF Office of ResearchReport Card 11

Part One: Presents a league table of child well-being in 29 of the world’s advanced economies.

Part Two: Looks at what children say about their own well-being (including a league table of children’s life satisfaction).

Part Three: Examines changes in child well-being in advanced economies over the first decade of the 2000s, looking at each country’s progress in educational achievement, teenage birth rates, childhood obesity levels, the prevalence of bullying, and the use of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs.


Report Card 13: Fairness for Children (2016)UNICEF RC13

by the UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti

A league table of inequality in child well-being in rich countries

This Report Card presents an overview of inequalities in child well-being in 41 countries of the European Union (EU) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). It focuses on ‘bottom-end inequality’ – the gap between children at the bottom and those in the middle – and addresses the question ‘how far behind are children being allowed to fall?’ in income,  education, health and life satisfaction.


Supporting and Caring for our Gender Expansive Youth: Lessons from the Human Rights Campaign’s Youth Survey (2014)

Photo Gender Expansive Youth Reportby the Human Rights Campaign Foundation and Gender Spectrum

Over the last decade or so, new conversations around gender have been emerging. From the cover of TIME magazine to prominent television coverage with Diane Sawyer and Oprah Winfrey, the increased visibility of children and youth whose gender identities and expressions challenge conventional understandings is teaching us that gender is not as simple as what the doctor declares at birth.

Even as many parents and youth-serving professionals — including educators, healthcare providers and social workers — try to keep pace with the contemporary lives of youth, a gap is growing between generational conceptions and expressions of gender.


World Family Map 2015 (2015)

by Child Trends, Social Trends Institute and Institute for Family StudiesWorld Family Map 2015

Mapping Family Change and Child Well-Being Outcomes

The World Family Map report monitors the global health of families by tracking 16 indicators in 49 countries, representing all regions of the world. This year’s report includes an essay examining how parents divide labor-force participation, housework, and child care.


 

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